Bird conditions, ho...
 

Bird conditions, how is it looking everywhere?  

Page 9 / 10
  RSS
john mcg
(@settertude)
Estimable Member

Back to Grouse.

regarding my piece of heaven. Over those years observing, learning and wondering the population seemed stable.

Brood locations changed somewhat, but where the dogs and I found birds was very consistent and almost always micro coverts close to a section of more mature forest. Because of the nature of that area of Southern NH there being lots of similar areas separated by tracks of mature forest with roads and other artifacts as well. I saw sizable broods of birds most years and thought about why the population didn’t grow considering the protective cover and vast supply of varied sustenance. As reading and conversations with my betters revealed, young Grouse of the year are apt to fly away looking for new haunts and yet I never witnessed a consistent population in adjacent areas. I am still trying to grok all of that.

forgive my musing, but I suppose I miss those coverts.

https://woodlandclearing.wordpress.com

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 4, 2019 6:14 pm
Moonshine
(@moonshine)
Noble Member

@settertude

OK -

You stated, “It is easy to bring politics into most conversations.”; then you added, “my' observation that more folks find it harder to ignore political implications or causality than to bring them to the fore.”

I stated, “It’s just as easy to keep politics out of conversations.“

To my mind, your statement “invoked a doing.” And, I don’t accept your observation as valid.

We’re either disagreeing, which we can certainly agree to do, or I’m incapable of interpreting your words accurately.

I don’t see any reason to continue this discussion. Thanks.

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 4, 2019 6:27 pm
john mcg
(@settertude)
Estimable Member

Because the issues are mostly very charged with strong feelings, it’s more difficult to refrain than it is to let loose, for more than half of folks. Although in the context of a forum, the community pressure helps keep this at bay...but it requires effort for folks to abstain. To their credit.

letting loose on convictions is humanly easier than refraining.

maybe this helps.

 

what can you add to my musings on that heavenly Grouse cover?

I have much to learn.

This post was modified 2 months ago by john mcg

https://woodlandclearing.wordpress.com

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 4, 2019 6:36 pm
Moonshine
(@moonshine)
Noble Member

@settertude

I don’t know anything about ruffed grouse.

“letting loose on convictions is humanly easier than refraining.”

I don’t agree, it just takes determination.

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 4, 2019 7:12 pm
john mcg
(@settertude)
Estimable Member

Thanks for the response. I understand.

have a great evening. Chuck Eyes on the grill soon out here.

fresh corn on cob, too. I am hungry.

https://woodlandclearing.wordpress.com

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 4, 2019 7:22 pm
Greg T.
(@greg-t)
Famed Member

Hi guys,

 A far better topic of conversation would be to ask me about chasing sharptails in the big Woods. While knee deep in blueberries.

The population we work the dogs on, as I understand it, is the furthest east population of sharptails on this continent. There might be a topic of conversation hidden in there.

"Chemists make good solutions" 🙂

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 5, 2019 12:12 pm
thornton
(@thornton)
Noble Member

Blueberries & Grasshoppers, isn't that a key for sharptails in Alaska as well?

Do you consider the western stretch of the bird from it's eastern Yoop presence to be a stretch for long term or are the birds simply taking full advantage of fire's temporary advantages?

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 5, 2019 12:26 pm
Greg T.
(@greg-t)
Famed Member

@thornton

 Good questions! I too noticed the similarity, and I am always on the lookout for black bears while up there.

 As an on-again off-again member of the michigan Sharptailed Grouse Association, my general feeling, having listened to the professionals for many years, is that sharptails (referred to by native people as Firebirds) require landscape level disturbance every so often to propagate.

 Simplifying, having probed this question at length with fish and wildlife representatives, is that in order to have large populations of sharp tails spread over large areas, you have to have large fires. Since that isn’t compatible with human populations in the upper Peninsula, we’ll never have huge numbers, and And we should never expect a season on federal land.

That leaves the actual hunting of them to state owned land and private land through the HAP program, all of which is located in the eastern end of the UP.

I was told that after a burn it takes about a year, and then sharptails move in during their dispersion and then as it grows up over the course of 15 to 20 years, when it gets tight enough the population begins to decline. Hopefully there’s another fire somewhere not too far away, clearing some ground, so that the birds can settle in there for a time.

still, it’s easy walking and peaceful.

"Chemists make good solutions" 🙂

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 5, 2019 1:15 pm
thornton
(@thornton)
Noble Member

15-20 years, which would appear to be heading into the slow range of succession and more in line with reverting farm land than with the response found on reverting corporate paper acreage, for example....or am I mistaken? A good thing, if so.

Did the experts note the speed expected for the reverting land to become unpopular with the sharptail....after that 15-20 and, what aspects of the succession are most problematic for them? Lack of open ground lek-type areas, food, winter cover, predator access or ????

Fire....my memory fails me. Doesn't fire tend to decrease the ph of soils and don't blueberries require acid soils and if so, do the blueberries take a while to increase post fire? Any thought on the lag time for sharptails to find dispersion events successful enough for magazine articles?

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 5, 2019 2:09 pm
Greg T.
(@greg-t)
Famed Member

 I can’t precisely comment on dispersal. I don’t know if sharptail presence is a function of lekking , or of fire.  

I was repeatedly told that after an area is cleared, they move in.

And after it grows up, they leave.

That leaves non fire disturbance as a possibility, but I was also told that scale and cost made it unlikely, except as a planted stand was brought to market.  So, looong time lines.

I think blueberry barrens are generally poor soils.  Slow growing areas.  So that’s prolly an influence on how long they stay around.

"Chemists make good solutions" 🙂

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 5, 2019 2:46 pm
Further North
(@geoff-roznak)
Honorable Member

@greg-t

Interesting discussion, thanks.

We've got a few sharpies a bit north and west of here...I've not hunted them, preferring to wait until they reach a more stable population, but they are fun to run the dogs on.

"Some people stand tall as great leaders because they elevate all the people around them, some seek to stand tall by pushing all around them down."

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 5, 2019 11:36 pm
Greg T.
(@greg-t)
Famed Member

 I just thought I might add some additional interesting factoids.  It seems there is some international migration of Sharptailed grouse between Canada and the United States across the St. Mary’s River system.

Apparently people have seen blocks of sharptails  fly back-and-forth across the river, and genetically those on one side of the river are indistinguishable from those on the other.  

The fire evidence suggests that the large burns that would sweep the upper peninsula occasionally ended at the natural fire break of the St. Mary’s River, so, there are good populations of Sharptailed grouse on Sugar Island,  Drummond Island and some of the grassier places along that river.

We have a 3 week season during Oct.

When I was much younger, we would find them in the pine barrens south of Gaylord on occasion.

 

"Chemists make good solutions" 🙂

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 6, 2019 10:25 am
thornton
(@thornton)
Noble Member

I see there are plans to transplant sharp-tails into the northern lower....as opposed to the planned area farther west in the U.P.

Was that due to study recommendations, politics or a long-standing wish, a la those Gaylord days, in your opinion?

This post was modified 2 months ago by thornton
ReplyQuote
Posted : August 6, 2019 10:31 am
Greg T.
(@greg-t)
Famed Member

I have some properties in Roscommon and Crawford counties, which is where the pine barrens are.

With the arrival of Arauco, we will see cutting on an unprecedented scale of scrub pine in that area.  All opening the region long term for a sharptail revival.

 

Its not an uncommon story,  no margin no mission.

"Chemists make good solutions" 🙂

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 6, 2019 11:12 am
Further North
(@geoff-roznak)
Honorable Member

I have seen sharpies up in the UP, but it was a long time ago.  Mid 90s.

"Some people stand tall as great leaders because they elevate all the people around them, some seek to stand tall by pushing all around them down."

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 6, 2019 11:14 am
Page 9 / 10

Share: