A story to ponder  

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Ed Carroll
(@ecarroll)
Honorable Member

In case you have not received your September/October issue yet, we are interested in feedback.

https://shootingsportsman.com/instagrouse/

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Posted : July 28, 2017 2:08 pm
SxS Shooter
(@sxs-shooter)
Illustrious Member

https://shootingsportsman.com/instagrouse/

Ever get the feeling that you've been cheated?

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Posted : July 28, 2017 6:20 pm
SxS Shooter
(@sxs-shooter)
Illustrious Member

Yep. Those fellows are creating their own good ol' days... And these days they are able to instantly share them and look back upon them thru their social media accounts and online postings - as well as their memories. I like the way the it reads. Good job Reid Bryant.

Ever get the feeling that you've been cheated?

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Posted : July 28, 2017 6:29 pm
dam16sxs
(@dam16sxs)
Reputable Member

Ed, I'm 70, or very nearly so. I see these young men doing it their way and my first reaction is that of being a cantankerous old b-----d about them and their strange way of doing it, thinking "That's not the way we did it!" or "That's now how it's supposed to be done." all the while trying to be that 'jealous guardian of the Holy Grail of Grouse and Woodcock Hunting Tradition and Nostalgia.'

I see the tattoos, I see all the newest gear (but they redeem themselves by shooting the old classic American guns) - the pipes almost seem pretentious. The electronics and digital hand-held stuff is all new to me. I don't understand all those tattoos - I don't understand what they are supposed to mean or what the wearer is trying to say or portray. I've always been of the mind that "You don't see bumper stickers on a Maserati." But that's just me - I'm sure I'm in the minority these days.
I've made hundreds, ne thousands of memories with my own cronies though, and all the time we were doing it our way.

What's so different?
The birds haven't changed...
The dogs haven't changed...
The beech and maple hills and the alder bottoms haven't changed...
The frosty mornings and T-shirt afternoons of Indian Summer haven't changed either.
The players are younger... but so were we a long time ago.
They play by the same rules of honor and ethics we have always espoused.
They cherish their time in the upland covers just as we have always done and do to this very day.
They pay homage to their quarry, the grouse and woodcock, in a respectful and reverent way.
They relish the "Grouse Camp" life regardless of how primitive or luxurious it may be.

The first several paragraphs really grabbed me by the suspenders and pulled me right in - Great Opening!!

And so, I apprehensively continued to read... and I could see myself and my Dad and Uncle Jack and our host Hubert in that bare little "Grouse Camp" in the hills of Vermont a half-century ago. And I could see myself and my young friends there in that same camp and in the covers as we matured as grouse hunters after the old guys couldn't do it anymore - and then they each died and I, along with my middle-aged cronies, carried on... in our own way.

It's a different camp these days. We need young blood to carry it on just as we did.
Nothing changes but the players. When we're in Grouse Camp, be it in Michigan or Vermont, Maine or Wisconsin, Pennsylvania or West Virginia time stands still. The act of, the art of, the tradition of grouse hunting remains the same if you carry it in your heart from Autumn to Autumn.

These young fellows in Michigan in this article will progress through the covers and the seasons and the changing factors in their own lives and will someday look back at those sharp memories with their guilded edges and appreciate the younger guys coming along doing it their way, but doing it none the less.

I liked the article - it was well written.

Dean

Make memories with the young ones in your life - they will call up your spirit after you're gone.

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Posted : July 28, 2017 9:03 pm
thornton
(@thornton)
Noble Member

Differences, thankfully, always exist…. easily evidenced in a bent stem on a briar or one that is Bing straight and, in tamping cavendish or latakia.
Some simply do not mind smoke in their eyes, while some prefer a campfire for more than the glow….and that only touches upon the choices.
Much as occurs with scatterguns and loads, boots, birds and, blessed be them, the birddogs.

I would wager the differences I note in the article’s lads is mostly on the surface. I might say like a bit of rust but…the surface trips up too many of us, exactly as do my stabs at humor.
So, forget I said it.
It is best to allow time and experience to discover either differences or connections.
A bird hunting trip or cabin time are odds on a sound way to introduce and uncover both in a person as bad luck, rain, dogs peeing in a room corner or, some other adversity does not build character as much as it reveals it.
A story then told.

Re all things birdhunting, from the Appalachian hillside flats to the shortgrass, no one knows it all and no one knows the handshake to appreciating it all.
Good to accept differences evident in the corners of these lads, along with welcoming any understanding of white smut on a leather glove or how good a shower feels after a day of snow barely to the flake stage….whenever it happens.
Good to find connections, good to learn.

I do wonder if I somehow wish to be where they are now and, learning.
I think not…best to continue to try and learn where I am….I do envy their shared optimism though.
Time can blunt that a tad.
I would hope two things for them.
Fingers crossed that they never pick out or hold onto friends based only upon a mirror, as I have discovered that a shared interest in an activity is no guarantee of an interest in sharing a truck seat or tavern table.
I also hope that they do not fail to fathom why they, as Birdhunters, never should be placed higher than third.

Good luck to da boys as they step smartly along….whether it is through new fields of autumn, along a path familiar to me or, into their own and individual futures.

Oh…and, for me, it was a heartfelt tug on the galluses…..see, always differences even as the feelings are the same.

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Posted : July 28, 2017 10:27 pm
thornton
(@thornton)
Noble Member

Differences, thankfully, always exist…. easily evidenced in a bent stem on a briar or one that is Bing straight and, in tamping cavendish or latakia.
Some simply do not mind smoke in their eyes, while some prefer a campfire for more than the glow….and that only touches upon the choices.
Much as occurs with scatterguns and loads, boots, birds and, blessed be them, the birddogs.

I would wager the differences I note in the article’s lads are mostly on the surface. I might say like a bit of rust but…the surface trips up too many of us, exactly as do my stabs at humor.
So, forget I said it.
It is best to allow time and experience to discover either differences or connections.
A bird hunting trip or cabin time are odds on a sound way to introduce and uncover both in a person as bad luck, rain, dogs peeing in a room corner or, some other adversity does not build character as much as it reveals it.
A story then told.

Re all things birdhunting, from the Appalachian hillside flats to the shortgrass, no one knows it all and no one knows the handshake to appreciating it all.
Good to accept differences evident in the corners of these lads, along with welcoming any understanding of white smut on a leather glove or how good a shower feels after a day of snow barely to the flake stage….whenever it happens.
Good to find connections, good to learn.

I do wonder if I somehow wish to be where they are now and, learning.
I think not…best to continue to try and learn where I am….I do envy their shared optimism though.
Time can blunt that a tad.
I would hope two things for them.
Fingers crossed that they never pick out or hold onto friends based only upon a mirror, as I have discovered that a shared interest in an activity is no guarantee of an interest in sharing a truck seat or tavern table.
I also hope that they do not fail to fathom why they, as Birdhunters, never should be placed higher than third.

Good luck to da boys as they step smartly along….whether it is through new fields of autumn, along a path familiar to me or, into their own and individual futures.

Oh…and, for me, it was a heartfelt tug on the galluses…..see, always differences even as the feelings are the same.

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Posted : July 28, 2017 10:29 pm
Greg T.
(@greg-t)
Famed Member

I don't do "Social media" beyond posting on some BBS's.

Social media brings people together.
So, birds of a feather can more easily flock together.

I have no doubt these young guys are sampling the Upland life in a way that times and circumstance allow them to.
The electronic media is probably the same as using an autoloader in 1910. New, and different to others.

I own a cabin near Meredith (it's where the Gladwin Field trial grounds are located), and I wonder if I may have crossed path's with them. If so, I probably just tipped my hat and went on down the road a piece.

Overall, I'm glad there are some youngsters that seem "stoked".

* Stoked is my weak attempt at suggesting how "down with my bad self" I can be. Yo.
Word.

"Chemists make good solutions" 🙂

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Posted : July 29, 2017 12:31 pm
dam16sxs
(@dam16sxs)
Reputable Member

Greg T. you kill me - that's funny stuff. it really is.

Make memories with the young ones in your life - they will call up your spirit after you're gone.

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Posted : July 29, 2017 12:38 pm
Brad Hire
(@brad-hire)
Trusted Member

One of my late Grandfather's, a veteran of both WW2 and the Korean War, once told me how much he regretted his tattoos. He said he got them because his buddy's got them too. They were a long way from home and he said very drunk. I think he felt the decision to get them made him feel as if he weren't his own man. This generation gets them because they think it makes them unique.

The really great writers of old told a story wound around hunting or fishing, but the theme always had a moral to catch and was non-heroic.

I enjoyed the article a little, though I must candidly admit I found it a bit pretentious. It would have worked for me if the focus hadn't been so much on posing as old time values blended with new age hunting heroes. I don't care about their tobacco choice or their nicknames. Stories about dogs and what happened while hunting and places to hunt and what your camp or dog looks like make for interesting articles.

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Posted : July 29, 2017 1:24 pm
Greg T.
(@greg-t)
Famed Member

I think aspiration (this is an aspirational magazine) is essential in developing upland lifestyle consumers.
It might seem pretentious, and of course form does follow function, and all, but, catalogs and magazines ( wish books my mother would say) depend on aspiration.

The tattoo thing (whether I like them or not) is a generational gap that is here to stay.

It depends on what attitudes you were raised with regarding them.

There is no doubt that the explosion of tattoo artists in the last 25 years has left a mark on the young.
It's their business, not mine.

They'll be where I am soon enough.

So, just like the use of electronic scouting, gps's (in all it's forms), social media, and craft brews, it's just a sign of the times, going forward.

"Chemists make good solutions" 🙂

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Posted : July 29, 2017 2:08 pm
thornton
(@thornton)
Noble Member

I pray that the recent Whitehouse change-ups do not have the fellas all upset and puffing briskly to the point of bowl burnout.....but, if so, then they will fit in just fine with the despisers on both sides here.

If needed, Welcome!.....reckon they will look in or...look away?
The important question may be.....what do they think of others claiming an upland scattergun tableau connection?

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Posted : July 29, 2017 2:35 pm
Brad Hire
(@brad-hire)
Trusted Member

I agree with what you wrote, Greg. Tatts don't bother me, but I have yet to be impressed by one. Design scarring might get my attention, but our kids aren't that tough.

Upland bird hunting has become the sport of the very few and I find myself liking it so. No one to impress with big antlers and plenty of room to plot my own course. I enjoyed seeing youngsters out on their own enjoying it how they want.

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Posted : July 29, 2017 2:41 pm
kgb
 kgb
(@kgb)
Prominent Member

Very well written story and the content would tick off a fistful of winning ruff/woodcock hunting buzzword bingo cards. A Ryman and a Parker carry a story. GSPs and Ithacas, maybe not so much.

Steve Smith wrote of a time of reflection "I laugh out loud at myself. I have my Parker and my orange belton setter and my station wagon and I have on my vest and brush pants and weathered boots and my pipe and my primpy little tweed hat with the pins that show I know how to pay dues. I am a living cliche. I don't know if I love it or hate it."

No idea what primpy is, but I'd take a station wagon.

Bore, n. ; everybody else's synonym for "shotgun enthusiast."

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Posted : July 29, 2017 8:30 pm
Junnie
(@junnie)
Famed Member

One of my late Grandfather's, a veteran of both WW2 and the Korean War, once told me how much he regretted his tattoos. He said he got them because his buddy's got them too. They were a long way from home and he said very drunk. I think he felt the decision to get them made him feel as if he weren't his own man. This generation gets them because they think it makes them unique.

Can't stand Tats on man or woman: Tramp Stamps, make a woman look cheap and whorish.

Had a Gunny who told the platoon, if you must get a tat, make sure a short sleeve shirt covers it, he was right.

Believe it all started in Hollywood with the thespians and wannabes. All the dummies followed suit thinking it must be cool.

As the old guy in Bonnie & Clyde: why do you want to mark you body all up looking so cheap.

Tramp Stamps: Some of the young women, good lookers have there legs all marked up with cartoon characters, they must have twin sisters, one person can't be that dumb.

Once a man, twice a child....

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Posted : July 30, 2017 4:45 pm
Moonshine
(@moonshine)
Noble Member

Leviticus 19:28;

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Posted : July 30, 2017 5:21 pm
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