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Lee Sykes
(@lee-sykes)
Trusted Member
Posted by: Buford

Very nice!  Check out the proof pressure:  1630 bar.  Don't have to worry what you feed it, almost double a typical 900 bar CIP proof pressure.  Like the Rizzinis, offered in alloy frames too for hunters.  The Rizzini BR110 in 28 gauge in steel is 6 pounds, which is a fine weight for me.  I wouldn't want anything over 6.5 pounds for a field gun.

Bruce

 

I assume that 900 bar is for a 12 gauge, proofed for 1 1/8 oz of shot.  The smaller the bore, the greater the p.s.i.  So it bears no relation to the proof pressure of the 12 bore gun.  

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Posted : November 11, 2018 4:38 pm
Buford
(@bernacki)
Estimable Member

You are correct that smaller bores produce higher pressures, but the 1630 bar still greatly exceeds the CIP proof requirements for the 3" 2o gauge or the 3" 28 gauge.

Bruce

http://www.cip-bobp.org/homologation/en/tdcc_public?page=2&cartridge_type_id=7

This post was modified 1 month ago by Buford
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Posted : November 11, 2018 9:39 pm
Dave B - L.C. Smith Man
(@dave-buehner)
Famed Member

Buford,

   You are correct sir, however if you use the new SpredR shells no worries about the pressure and the shells work well in the old American classic double guns.   I use them quite a bit now Grouse and Woodcock hunting.  The SpredR shells down the birds quite nicely with minimum recoil.

Dave B. - L.C. Smith Man

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Posted : November 13, 2018 11:41 am
Buford
(@bernacki)
Estimable Member

Thanks.  Unfortunately, I have to shoot non-tox mainly and I have been using the Kent bismuth loads to good effect in my 20 gauge this year.  My original comment was only to point out that the Fabarm was stoutly proofed at 1630 bar when a 3" magnum seems to be proofed at 1320 bar.  We won't get into the extra steel proofing, exhibiting the so-called fleur-de-lis proof mark.  Even Beretta USA doesn't know what it means.

Bruce

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Posted : November 13, 2018 12:50 pm
Lee Sykes
(@lee-sykes)
Trusted Member

Dave, I notice you are pretty high on spredr loads and seem to push them at every opportunity.  How about using barrels that are properly choked for the game, to begin with?  i know that they are supposed make a full choke perform like i.c. and can see why that might be advantageous in some instances but can see no practical use for a spredr load in a bore as small as 28.  A wider, thinner pattern is just robbing Peter to pay Paul. especially with less than an ounce of shot.  Spredrs may allow you to hit a few birds you would have otherwise missed but would certainly increase lost birds and "head up" retrieves.  

 

 

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Posted : November 13, 2018 3:35 pm
Dave B - L.C. Smith Man
(@dave-buehner)
Famed Member

Lee,

   I do like the SpredR shells especially in our pre 13 L.C. Smith double guns, that were choked for slow burning powders.  I use them under my 1st trigger, the 2nd trigger usually has good Fiocchi or B&P stuff.  It all depends on how the original gun was actually choked.  The SpredR's work great and they keep an owner from having to open the chokes up for Grouse hunting on older guns, leaving them in original condition for the next generation of the family.  

Further we always hunt with good gun dogs that track and retrieve well, seldom do we ever loose a winged bird of any kind.  A dog who does not track and retrieve well is only half a dog in the Grouse woods.

Dave B. - L.C. Smith Man

Pine Creek Shadow, our new Gordon Grouse Dog puppy from Clearcut Kennels.

Click on picture to enlarge.

DSCN2694

This post was modified 4 weeks ago 3 times by Dave B - L.C. Smith Man
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Posted : November 19, 2018 8:28 pm Lee Sykes and setterman222 liked
setterman222
(@setterman222)
Eminent Member

Fine lookin' Gordon pup, Dave!!

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Posted : November 20, 2018 9:30 am Lee Sykes liked
john mcg
(@settertude)
Estimable Member

Sure is a cute looking pup.

Nice shoe polishing kit.

https://woodlandclearing.wordpress.com

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Posted : November 22, 2018 12:51 pm
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